My Life in the Roleplaying Game Industry

I’ve always loved tabletop roleplaying games. I’ve played literally dozens and dozens of different systems but my all-time favorite is the D6 system invented by West End Games. They used it most famously in their Star Wars games from the late 80s through the 1990s. Elegant simplicity.

So after I’d been writing at Marvel for awhile, I decided I’d branch out into other avenues. I knew Nikola Virtis fairly well, since I ran a fansite devoted to West End’s DC Universe game and she’d been nice enough to send me some free stuff. When I asked if I could write for them, she put me on a book called D6 Space: The Fires of Amatsumara. By this time West End had lost the Star Wars license and were trying to reinvent themselves with various in-house setting. Amatsumara was basically Firefly, with a few modifications. When Nikola described it to me, it was Firefly-meets-Cowboy Bebop. Anyway, I was assigned about half the book to write and given a ton of free reign with the character. Basically, the high concept of the setting and brief descriptions of the planets were already in place but I had to flesh them out, fill the planets with characters (and stat them out!), then give a bunch of story ideas for each. It was fun and I included a few of my own homebrew characters in the setting, figuring that this would be the only one way I’d ever see them in print. I enjoyed it quite a bit and even started work on a second book for them (The Long Winter, about an earth frozen after another Ice Age) but it was cancelled after I’d written about 8,000 words.

And then… well, I kinda wanted to get paid. I had a contract, after all. But West End didn’t send that check… and when I called the phone number on my contract, it had been disconnected. Uh-oh! So I tried emailing the guy in charge (not Nikola — she was always aces with me) and wouldn’t get a response, again and again. So I posted about it on the WEG message boards, which did two things: it finally brought the publisher’s attention to me (he wasn’t happy) and it brought out a bunch of fanboys who jumped all over me because they would have been glad to have worked for free. As I explained, I loved West End, too — and you know, I might have worked for free if they’d asked me to. I really dug the company and its system. But they didn’t. They offered me a contract and I felt I should get my money. I eventually did but it was well over 18 months after they had initially said I would get it.

I then did a book called Godsend Agenda: U.S.E.R.’s Most Wanted, which was basically a collection of villains. I got to dream up several dozen villains and stat them out — they used a variant on West End’s D6 System, so I was right at home. I enjoyed the experience and the folks at Khepera Publishing were easy to deal with. They wanted me to do more for them but I got too busy with the pulp stuff and never did.

And that’s my exciting adventures in the roleplaying game world. I learned that rpg publishers are, by and large, living on the edge financially. Anyone who thinks comics or pulp sales are low should look at the lower-tier rpg publishers to feel better about themselves. But the rpg world is filled with fans and it’s nice to see people working on things that they love. I’m glad I got the chance to work with WEG and Khepera.

A Brief Update

At a low point mentally and emotionally – hopefully it will pass soon. In the meantime, I’m writing a Nature Boy/Nature Girl story. Not sure it’ll go anywhere but it’s keeping me busy until I get a real idea.

Currently reading The Scarlet Gospels by Clive Barker. It’s okay so far but I’m only about thirty pages in.

No new reviews of The Sword of Hel or Lazarus Gray Volume Ten though LG has now gotten three ratings and is currently sitting at 4.75 out of 5 stars. Not bad.

Frustrations

The past couple of days have been trying ones for me – I suffer from anxiety and depression at the best of times but at the moment I’m feeling annoyed with my writing career. The negative reaction to The Sword of Hel is demoralizing in the sense that when I try to branch out from my usual work, it doesn’t seem to go over well… whereas the ratings for the tenth book in the Lazarus Gray series are, as usual, high. I’m not unhappy with my ‘normal’ work but it does seem like what most people want is for me to just continue doing the same old, same old. Of course, sales in general have stagnated in recent years and I continue to feel totally ignored by the ‘critics’. I’ve often said that I have a compulsion to write and that I’ve tried to quit numerous times over the years. There are definitely moments when I wish I could wash my hands of it all and just turn my back on all these characters and series — but I’ve learned that I’d just be drawn back in by some half-assed idea lol

Oh, well. Happy Monday!

Rabbit Heart

Most of my writing career has been focused on pulp-style heroes or even outright superheroes… but I’ve occasionally made forays into other types of fiction. RABBIT HEART is a slasher horror novel set in my birthplace, Milledgeville, Georgia. It’s brutal in terms of violence and so sexually explicit that it’s made close friends blush at the mere sight of me after reading it. The beautiful cover by Jason Levesque has always made the book one of the top sellers in my catalogue.

Recommendation: the Pendergast Series

The Pendergast novels by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child are some of the best examples of New Pulp in the market today. Pendergast is such a wonderfully eccentric, nearly superhuman figure that he puts me in mind of such classic sleuths as Sherlock Holmes and The Shadow. I’m currently reading Bloodless, but some of my favorites in the series are Still Life With Crows, White Fire, and The Cabinet of Curiosities.

If you’re looking for some quality entertainment, give them a try!