Tarantino & The Art of Pulp

tarentinoWelcome back! First order of business is to let everyone know that Ubergeeks Episode 44 is now live – you can download it right now. If you’re subscribed, you can click on the Ubergeeks link at the top of this blog to figure out how to access it. This week, we spend a lot of time talking about FOX’s show The Following and its merits — plus its many faults.

If you’re not following me on Twitter, you’re missing out. I’ve been spewing most of my truly opinionated comments over there — so if you’re burning to know what I think about Stormalong Savage or the Wold Newton stuff or anything else pulp related, that’s where you can find it. My most recent tweets feed on this blog but the older stuff is accessible via Twitter itself.  Unlike my personal Facebook page, my Twitter account is pretty much writing-centric, with no updates about what cute stuff my little boy has been up to. It’s all pulp, writing, comics, etc. on Twitter for me.

Today I’m using an image of Quentin Tarantino to accompany this blog — mainly because I really like his films. He’s a very unique creator right now and even though he sometimes gives into his personal excesses, what artist doesn’t? My favorite Tarantino movies are: Django Unchained, Kill Bill, and Inglorious Basterds. I know, I know — where’s Pulp Fiction? I like PF but I don’t think it’s Quentin’s best work — not even close. It’s still good but if I want to break out a Quentin movie to re-watch, it’s usually Kill Bill though I think that Django will join that one in my go-to list of films to watch when I want to revisit an old favorite. I also have to confess to a bit of annoyance with PF because the title of that movie has meant that I’ve spent the better part of the past ten years telling civilians that my pulp writings have nothing to do with John Travolta or Samuel L. Jackson 🙂

What I love about Quentin’s movies is that you can easily see all the things he loves as a fan of the medium but he puts twists on them that make them feel unique to him. I find his films to be the perfect embodiment of the New Pulp movement because of that — he’s so obviously a fan of exploitation grind-house films and Asian cinema but he’s not just remaking those movies, he’s adding new elements that recognize the changes in film-making and society in general.

I try to do that with my own New Pulp writing — I want you to see my influences but I also want them to come through as ‘Barry Reese’ in some way. Hopefully I succeed more often than I fail — but I’m sure I give in to my personal excesses all too often.

Moving on, I’ll be recording a new episode of The Shadow Fan Podcast tomorrow — if you ever have a request for me to review or talk about something Shadow-related on the show, let me know!

 

Monday Stuff: New Interview, Django Unchained and More

djangoLots of things to talk about as we start a new week — and the first order of business is to direct you to Hidden Face Crime Fiction where you can read an interview with yours truly, conducted by the talented Michael Famiglietti. Michael and I had a great phone conversation about a wide range of topics, including The Rook, New Pulp, The Shadow and a lot more. Check it out and while you’re there, look around at the rest of his site. It’s good stuff.

Went to see Django Unchained this weekend and I LOVED it. I like Tarentino’s films but this one is right up there with Kill Bill as my favorite. Christopher Waltz does a stunning turn as Dr. King Schultz, a German bounty hunter with allies himself with Django, played by Jamie Foxx. All the performances were fantastic — Foxx was particularly impressive, as was Leonardo DiCaprio, Don Johnson and Samuel L. Jackson. It’s violent, yes, but it’s also funny, sad and touching. I can’t recommend it highly enough.

Still working away on Lazarus Gray Volume Four — I probably won’t be able to finish it this week but by the end of February, it should be off to my publisher. Fingers crossed, people!

If you came here today looking for the New Pulp Bestsellers List, it will return next week  at its new home, which will be over at All Pulp.