Barry Reese

Pulp Writer Extraordinaire

wayne_coverEvery so often I focus on a New Pulp work that I think merits your attention. Sometimes it will be something that’s brand new, other times I’ll look at something that’s a few years old. This week, I’m encouraging you to check out Wayne of Gotham by Tracy Hickman.

Before we dive into the book itself, let me show you how the publisher describes the work:

Two men separated by murder: Thomas, the rebellious doctor and heir to the vast Wayne empire, and Bruce, his son, whose life is forever altered by witnessing his parents’ murder. The slaying of Thomas and Martha Wayne is the torturous point on which Bruce turns to become Batman.

The Dark Knight’s file on the case has long been closed, the foundations of Bruce Wayne’s secret life secure in the simple genesis of a mugging gone horribly wrong.

These foundations are shaken, however, when an unexpected guest invades the grounds of Wayne Manor, raising questions about the event that ended the lives of the mother he loved and the father he worshipped, and sparked his unquenchable drive to protect and avenge.

To discover his real family history, Batman must face down old foes, his only confidant, and the evil heart of Arkham Asylum, and shoulder the new burden of a dark legacy.

This novel is a prose adventure of Batman – such things are sometimes very, very good. Other times, they are very, very bad. Since I am familiar with other works by Mr. Hickman (mostly in conjunction with Margaret Weis), I expected to enjoy this story quite a bit.

I most certainly did, though it’s not without some flaws.

There is no mention of the other Bat allies here, so there’s no Robin, Huntress, etc. We do get references to Barbara being in a wheelchair but there’s no telling if she was ever Batgirl or Oracle in this universe. The story jumps back and forth between the modern day and Thomas Wayne’s time. We find out that the elder Wayne was involved in a project aimed at removing all crime from Gotham City… but it ended with disastrous results, which are now haunting Bruce. Alfred may have complicit in keeping the truth from Bruce, which leads to some very tense scenes between the two. It’s pretty shocking to see their relationship disintegrate.

There’s a very compelling mystery here and I was riveted, curious to see where the author would go with it. He definitely went some places that I never thought he would.

If I have any complaints, it’s that some scenes are needlessly confusing and this version of Bruce is, if you’ll pardon my language, a real dick. He’s just a self-absorbed ass, who sits in the Batcave thinking these kinds of morose, over-written thoughts: I was young once… or was I? I don’t remember being young. The face is still strong but there are more lines in it than I remember. Dusk to dawn, fall to spring… Did the wheel of the years turn and I never noticed? There are no seasons in this cavern tomb where my soul resides. Does Gotham exist in an eternal rain-soaked night, or do I only see it that way?

I know – it’s like something straight out of Twilight. Thankfully, the entire book isn’t written like that… but too much of it is. That and the constant “tech babble” keeps this book from being a classic, in my opinion.

It is, however, worth reading if you’re a fan of Batman and want something a bit different.

One thought on “New Pulp Recommendation: Wayne of Gotham

  1. Arthur Sippo says:

    Hey Barry!

    I really enjoyed “Wayne of Gotham”
    too. Lots of really good pulpy moments. I listened to the audio book which was very well done. Probably the ensemble cast and sound effects helped to make the story more coherent. (And yes, Bruce was being a real jerk. Any guy who runs around in tights beating up criminals with his bare hands out of a sense of revenge needs to cut some slack when people do much less violent things out of a sense of honor or duty.) My only pet peeve was that they took the story 30 years out of its original roots. I would have loved to see the original 1939 Batman dealing with this problem. When you bring these characters forward you end up with improbable ultra-high-tech Schwatzification. (After Jules Schwartz who over-technologized the DC comic lines in the late 50s and turned me off to comics. That was when I discovered Doc Savage and my credibility in action stories was restored.)

    Ah, but I am a Pulp purist! I like to keep tings in their original timeline.

    BTW I am reading Satan’s Circus and it is a real hoot! Great stories. Great characters. What can I say?

    We ought to get you on the Book Cave for an update on all the things you’ve been doing. Drop me a line if you are interested.

    Art Sippo

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