Tarantino & The Art of Pulp

tarentinoWelcome back! First order of business is to let everyone know that Ubergeeks Episode 44 is now live – you can download it right now. If you’re subscribed, you can click on the Ubergeeks link at the top of this blog to figure out how to access it. This week, we spend a lot of time talking about FOX’s show The Following and its merits — plus its many faults.

If you’re not following me on Twitter, you’re missing out. I’ve been spewing most of my truly opinionated comments over there — so if you’re burning to know what I think about Stormalong Savage or the Wold Newton stuff or anything else pulp related, that’s where you can find it. My most recent tweets feed on this blog but the older stuff is accessible via Twitter itself.  Unlike my personal Facebook page, my Twitter account is pretty much writing-centric, with no updates about what cute stuff my little boy has been up to. It’s all pulp, writing, comics, etc. on Twitter for me.

Today I’m using an image of Quentin Tarantino to accompany this blog — mainly because I really like his films. He’s a very unique creator right now and even though he sometimes gives into his personal excesses, what artist doesn’t? My favorite Tarantino movies are: Django Unchained, Kill Bill, and Inglorious Basterds. I know, I know — where’s Pulp Fiction? I like PF but I don’t think it’s Quentin’s best work — not even close. It’s still good but if I want to break out a Quentin movie to re-watch, it’s usually Kill Bill though I think that Django will join that one in my go-to list of films to watch when I want to revisit an old favorite. I also have to confess to a bit of annoyance with PF because the title of that movie has meant that I’ve spent the better part of the past ten years telling civilians that my pulp writings have nothing to do with John Travolta or Samuel L. Jackson 🙂

What I love about Quentin’s movies is that you can easily see all the things he loves as a fan of the medium but he puts twists on them that make them feel unique to him. I find his films to be the perfect embodiment of the New Pulp movement because of that — he’s so obviously a fan of exploitation grind-house films and Asian cinema but he’s not just remaking those movies, he’s adding new elements that recognize the changes in film-making and society in general.

I try to do that with my own New Pulp writing — I want you to see my influences but I also want them to come through as ‘Barry Reese’ in some way. Hopefully I succeed more often than I fail — but I’m sure I give in to my personal excesses all too often.

Moving on, I’ll be recording a new episode of The Shadow Fan Podcast tomorrow — if you ever have a request for me to review or talk about something Shadow-related on the show, let me know!