gravedigger_05I’m over 35,000 words into the final Gravedigger novel and I hope to finish it before the end of November. This one is going very well but it’s bittersweet… a few characters die and we get to see a number of mysteries explained in full. Given the nature of the Gravedigger legacy, there are still tales that could be told about Charity and others but I do want to finish up the essential plot of Charity’s redemption with this one. George Sellas will be returning to do the cover, as he did with the first two books.

I’m also working a bit on a Babylon story that will introduce a spacefaring hero to my pulp adventure universe. The character was designed by George Sellas and I have Steven Wilcox doing some interior pieces for it.

Before the end of the year, I want to post a free Lazarus Gray Christmas story as my way of thanking all of you for your support.

And after all that… a new series will launch, one that’s set in 1964. It will be a sequel of sorts to to another of my continuing series but this one will be steeped in the high-adventure spy genre popularized by James Bond, the Man from UNCLE, etc. — character designs and interior art is by Chris Batista with a great Steven Novak cover. More details to come on that one soon! I’m very excited about it!

Our art today comes from the first Gravedigger book and is by Will Meugnio.

Ki-Gor Returns!


Dedicated to breathing new life into classic and sometimes forgotten Pulp Characters, Pulp Obscura, an imprint of Pro Se Productions in conjunction with Altus Press, announces the release of THE NEW ADVENTURES OF KI-GOR: THE DEVIL’S DOMAN-TALES OF THE JUNGLE LORD. Ki-Gor returns to Jungle Adventure as written by noted New Pulp author Barry Reese in print and digital formats.

“Ki-Gor,” says Tommy Hancock, Editor in Chief of Pro Se Productions, “definitely came into being at a time that many jungle types populated fictional Africa and even other jungle bound lands. Something, though, that makes this particular jungle hero stand out concerned those around him more than his own existence. To have Helene, a mate who stood toe-to-toe with Ki-Gor in every way, not to his side, is exciting in stories like this. Then throw in Timbu and the supporting cast and you have more than just another guy in a loin cloth. You have a realized character capable of fantastic adventures and he definitely has a couple in this new book, thanks to the ever talented Barry Reese.”

One of the Pulp Era’s greatest heroes returns! Created by John M. Reynolds, Ki-Gor, Lord of the Jungle, battled slave traders, dinosaurs, witch doctors, and lost civilization from 1939 to 1954 in the pages of “Jungle Stories.” Assisted by his beautiful and daring wife, Helene, and their loyal allies: the powerful Timbu Jones and the diminutive N’Geesso, Ki-gor continues to protect the peace of his jungle home.

From out of the past, the Jungle Lord stalks the wild once more! Ki-Gor and Helene and return to action in two exciting new adventures presented from the imagination of one of New Pulp’s finest authors, Barry Reese, in THE NEW ADVENTURES OF KI-GOR: THE DEVIL’S DOMAIN-TALES OF THE JUNGLE LORD from Pulp Obscura, an imprint of Pro Se Productions in conjunction with Altus Press.

Featuring a stunning cover by Mike Fyles and cover design and print formatting by Sean E. Ali, is available now at Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/New-Adventures-Ki-Gor–Devils-Domain/dp/1539352285/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1475845864&sr=8-5&keywords=ki-gor and Pro Se’s own store at http://www.prose-press.com for 10.00. 

This thrilling collection is also available as an Ebook, designed and formatted by Michael Woods Iacono for only $2.99 for the Kindle at https://www.amazon.com/New-Adventures-Ki-Gor-Devils-Domain-ebook/dp/B01LY3E60B/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1475846842&sr=8-6&keywords=ki-gor and via Smashwords in most formats at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/670348.

For more information on this title, interviews with the author, or digital copies to review this book, contact Pro Se Productions’ Director of Corporate Operations, Kristi King-Morgan at directorofcorporateoperations@prose-press.com.

To learn more about Pro Se Productions, go to http://www.prose-press.com. Like Pro Se on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ProSeProductions.

The Warlike Manchu

rook_v1_manchu_smallIn classic pulp hero tradition, most of The Peregrine’s enemies don’t make return appearances. But The Warlike Manchu is the exception to the rule — in fact, he appeared in each of The Peregrine’s omnibus editions! Obviously inspired by Sax Rohmer’s classic Fu Manchu, The Warlike Manchu does not consider himself a villain at all. He’s out to rule the world with an iron hand because that’s how humanity needs to be governed, lest our baser natures get the best of us. The Warlike Manchu was one of Max Davies’ tutors during his time preparing for his role as The Peregrine but when he learned of the Manchu’s connections to organized crime, Max refused the offer to rule at the Manchu’s side.

Aided by a group of assassins dubbed The Ten Fingers, The Warlike Manchu controls every manner of vice in Asia and eyes expanding his empire to the West. Though Chinese by birth, my take on The Warlike Manchu incorporates elements of various Asian mythologies to play up The Warlike Manchu as the ultimate “yellow menace” from the old pulps. He hates the Japanese but is willing to use their trappings and folklore to his own advantage, for instance.

The Peregrine and The Warlike Manchu have become the most bitter of enemies, clashing again and again. The highlights of their feud include:

“The Abomination” – In this story set in 1939, The Warlike Manchu re-enters The Peregrine’s life for the first time since they parted ways in 1922. Allied with an Egyptian necromancer named Ibis, The Manchu revives an ancient entity of pure destruction known as The Abomination. The Peregrine foils their plans for world domination but The Manchu escapes.

“Blitzkrieg” –  Set in 1940, The Warlike Manchu returns with a new pupil, a German named Hans Merkel, who has adopted the guise of the Japanese god of death, Shinigami. Merkel is The Peregrine’s true opposite number — like Max, he is haunted by the spirit of his dead father but in Merkel’s case, he slew his own father and enslaved his spirit. In this story, The Warlike Manchu kidnaps Max’s son, forcing The Peregrine to unite with the Manchu’s daughter in an attempt to stop the madman. Shinigami is killed and The Manchu’s immortality formula fails, reducing him to dust.

Death lasts only about two years, however, as The Warlike Manchu is revived in 1942’s “The Resurrection Gambit”. In this story, The Manchu embarks on a quest to find the Philosopher’s Stone, a search that leads both he and The Peregrine on a global chase. In the end, The Manchu escapes once more, swearing revenge on his most hated of enemies.

In 1943, The Warlike Manchu and The Peregrine are forced into an uneasy alliance, as both men seek to foil the plans of the Nazi vampire Baron Randolph Gustav. It’s clear that The Manchu respects Max greatly and would still seek an alliance between the two — but he also has come to believe that The Peregrine’s opposition to his plans has renewed the spark of life in his wretched heart. This is chronicled in “Dead of Night.”

1944 finds The Warlike Manchu teaming with Doctor Satan and Moriarty in “A Plague of Wicked Men,” one of the first adventures of The Claws of the Peregrine. The Manchu is apparently killed when the island he’s on sinks beneath the waves.

Once again, death seemed incapable of stopping The Warlike Manchu. At some point, he returned to bedevil Max Davies and his family — but his final defeat seems to have stuck. In 1967, William Davies (Max’s son) battled and defeated The Warlike Manchu, killing him while battling for possession of a magical Mayan tablet (“The Four Peregrines”).

No details about The Manchu’s activities between 1944 and 1967 are known — and given how many times he cheated death before, it’s conceivable that he has at least one more resurrection in store, even post ’67.

In addition to The Warlike Manchu’s appearances in The Peregrine’s series, The Ten Fingers have been name-dropped in both Gravedigger and Lazarus Gray, as The Manchu’s forces have infiltrated Sovereign City in the Thirties. In 1938, Lazarus met the Warlike Manchu face-to-face and managed to convince the villain that it would be in his best interests to avoid Sovereign in the future (“Tapestry,” Lazarus Gray Volume 6). It is unknown at this point if they had any later encounters.

Our image today is courtesy of George Sellas.

The Peregrine Omnibus Volume Three!



Award Winning Author Barry Reese created a character that many consider the penultimate of New Pulp creations- Max Davies, now known as The Peregrine. Pro Se Productions and Reese Unlimited, the author’s own imprint, are proud to announce that The Peregrine’s original adventures are now all back in print with the debut of THE PEREGRINE OMNIBUS VOLUME THREE in print and digital formats.

“Finally,” says Tommy Hancock, Editor in Chief of Pro Se Productions, “the entire collection of PEREGRINE stories is back in print and in a three volume omnibus set. These tales are a cornerstone of New Pulp and now readers old and new can enjoy the thrills, twists, and explosive characters that Barry has created in newly edited volumes. Barry has definitely planted his own indelible mark on Genre Fiction with The Peregrine.”

“Where the Good is Swallowed by the Dark… There the PEREGRINE Shall Plant His Mark!” New Voices guide the Peregrine through dark dreams and savage foes! Max Davies has pursued an ongoing mission of justice and vengeance guided by dark dreams and violent visions that compel him to don the mask of THE PEREGRINE. The creation of award winning Genre Fiction author Barry Reese, the amazing adventures of the Peregrine have been devoured by a loyal audience who await Max’s next adventure in the ever expanding REESE UNLIMITED universe. 

THE PEREGRINE OMNIBUS VOLUME THREE brings together an all star line up of New Pulp’s finest who lend their distinct voices to the narrative of Reese’s signature hero. Fly into action with Reese, Bobby Nash, Ron Fortier, Mike Bullock, Tommy Hancock, Percival Constantine, Russ Anderson, David White, Sean Taylor, Adam Lance Garcia, and James Palmer in THE PEREGRINE OMNIBUS VOLUME THREE!

Featuring an awe inspiring cover by legendary artist Norm Breyfogle and cover design and print formatting by Sean E. Ali, THE PEREGRINE OMNIBUS VOLUME THRE is available now at Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/Peregrine-Omnibus-Three-Barry-Reese/dp/1537773623/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1474471045&sr=8-1&keywords=peregrine+omnibus+three and Pro Se’s own store at http://www.prose-press.com for 30.00.  

This final volume of the PEREGRINE omnibus series is also available as an Ebook, designed and formatted by Forrest Dylan Bryant for only $4.99 for the Kindle at https://www.amazon.com/Peregrine-Omnibus-3-Reese-Barry-ebook/dp/B01LYVR6CR/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1474471045&sr=8-2&keywords=peregrine+omnibus+three and for most digital formats via Smashwords at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/666956.

For more information on this title, interviews with the author, or digital copies to review this book, contact Pro Se Productions’ Director of Corporate Operations, Kristi King-Morgan at directorofcorporateoperations@prose-press.com.

To learn more about Pro Se Productions, go to http://www.prose-press.com. Like Pro Se on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ProSeProductions.

My 10 Favorite Comic Book Artists

perezYeah, I like lists.

Anyway, in the past I’ve listed out my favorite Spider-Man writers, my favorite Spidey villains, my favorite classic and new pulp heroes & villains… heck, I even listed out my ten favorite pulp-inspired comics.

Today we’re looking at my top 10 favorite comic book artists. These are guys who always excite me when I hear their names are attached to various projects and over the years I’ve shared their work on my Facebook, on Tumblr, etc.

So let’s go!

10. Steve Rude – The Dude first came to my attention when he was working on Nexus. Loved the way he depicted the entire cast and he’s really underrated in the way that he draws facial expressions. The guy’s a master, period.

9. Jim Aparo – Aparo was the definitive Batman artist for me in the Seventies and I enjoyed his work on the Batman and the Outsiders series a lot. He also did great work on Aquaman over the years and in Brave and the Bold, he got to draw just about everybody!

8. Keith Giffen – If I had made this list in the 80s, Giffen would have been much, much higher. I adored his work on Legion of Super-Heroes but eventually his style became much more manic. I still enjoy it a lot (especially on Kirby-influenced projects) but there are times it comes off as a hot mess. Still, I’m always curious when I see his name attached to a project.

7. Will Meugniot – Will became one of my faves when he was doing DNAgents back in the 80s but I have continued to follow him through his work on Vanity and Femforce. He’s a remarkably talented guy and I’ve loved that I’ve had the chance to work with him on my own books.

6. Gene Colan – Colan was a master of atmosphere. I adored his pencils on Tomb of Dracula, Batman and Night Force. His work on other titles was sometimes a little odd in ways but I still loved his work. I mean, I would never have put him on Iron Man or Daredevil, for instance, and yet his pencils were so awesome that I didn’t even mind that he wasn’t a traditional superhero artist. He did work well on Batman, though.

5. Ivan Reis – The newest name on my list, Reis has really impressed me with his work on titles like Blackest Night, Green Lantern, Justice League and Aquaman. He’s amazing!

4. Chris Batista – I first noticed him on Legion of Super-Heroes and he’s actually my favorite Legion artist because he’s able to perfectly capture their youthful nature. I also really dug his work on Booster Gold and an all-too-brief run on Justice League. Why DC or Marvel hasn’t snatched him up for a major title is beyond me. I think he’d really rock on a New Gods revival, too.

3. John Byrne – Back in the day, Byrne was a stud. I followed him from X-Men to Fantastic Four to Alpha Flight to Superman… At some point, I think his work became somewhat less appealing to me but I still enjoy it. Aside from his work on Fantastic Four, I generally prefer him as an artist and not a writer but he’s capable of doing fine work on both sides of the creative fence.

2. Alan Davis – Captain Britain. Excalibur. The Nail. Batman. X-Men. Superboy’s Legion. I could go on and on. I am mad about his artwork. It’s fun, it’s sleek, it’s everything I want from a superhero artist. I’ve bought books simply because he drew them, even when I knew I’d dislike the story. He’s simply that good.

1. George Perez – The king of superhero artists in my opinion. He’s known for his crowd scenes — and they are awesome — but he’s also a fine character-based storyteller. Look at his run on New Teen Titans or Wonder Woman for proof. And unlike some artists, I find his later work to be just as good as the older stuff… Legion of 3 Worlds, his Avengers run with Kurt Busiek and his work on Worlds’ Finest are all fine examples of his more recent books that I think are great. For me, I’ll always associate him with the Titans first and foremost, then his work on Crisis. He also drew a fine, fine run of JLA.

Writers That Have Inspired Me

EmmaWatson-HarryCrowder03I’m not going to go in-depth as to why these guys have influenced me since in many ways, it would be hard to nail it down. These are authors that have been favorites of mine and are ones that when I read them, I consciously go “Wow, look how they did that! I want to be able to do that!” I certainly read and enjoy other authors besides just these guys but these are the ones that I’d list as inspirations (in no order other than what popped in my head). Some of them have styles that are very different from my own but I still feel like I’ve taken something from them along the way.

Paul Ernst

Robert E. Howard

Walter Gibson

Stephen King (“old” King anyway — ’70s & ’80s)

Michael Moorcock (Elric specifically)

Rob MacGregor (his Indiana Jones work)

Andy McDermott

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Frank Herbert (his Dune series)

Timothy Zahn

Chris Claremont

Clive Cussler

Marv Wolfman

Geoff Johns

Jim Shooter

Wayne Reinagel

Arthur Conan Doyle

Derrick Ferguson

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Lots of Stuff!

gravedigger_04_small_jpgThings are very busy around here so let’s give a run-down on what’s happening:

  1. The Peregrine Omnibus series is continuing with the release of the third volume. I’ve already approved the galleys so it should be out soon!
  2. My Ki-Gor stories that were originally published years ago by Wild Cat Books will be re-released in a new edition by Pro Se. I’ve seen the cover and it is lovely! It’s by Mike Fyles.
  3. Currently about 20% into the third volume of Gravedigger. This one is set in 1939 and resolves the matter of Charity Grace’s three-year tenure as the title hero. Will she be found wanting or has she done enough to remove the burden of sin from her soul? I’m hoping that George Sellas will be back onboard for cover and interiors.
  4. I’m taking some old fanfiction stories of mine and rewriting them to star a new hero, Babylon. I have the interior art pieces by Steven Wilcox already and George Sellas did a nifty color piece of the hero.
  5. Talking to Chris Batista about doing some design work on a new female hero that will debut soon.
  6. Submitted a mummy story to Flinch Books for inclusion in an upcoming anthology – if it meets with their approval, you can expect to see it appear in print before too long!

Our art today is by Will Meugniot and comes from the first volume of the Gravedigger series!